In this light and on this evening: The John Muir Award

Well, went to see Editors last week. They were really very good, hence the song lyric bit of the title.

Now accepting that the project is, largely, finished yet hoping the project will never end…..this is one of the best things I’ve done. Getting to know a lovely place better as the months pass is the core idea of my John Muir Award project.   I’ve always lingered over the signs of seasonal change, but this project is making me look a wee bit closer at the woodland and shore between Balmaha and Milarrochy Bay, by Loch Lomond, and in so doing, enjoy it all the more.  Here is my plan for the four challenges in the award (discover, explore, conserve and share):  anyone looking at this can judge my progress for themselves.  My awareness of wild flowers in particular has gone from a low starting point to a not-quite-so-low point at present; I’ve begun to appreciate the level of detail needed to identify a plant. I still think it’s all beautiful.

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Wild Carrot Seed Head

With autumn in full swing, things have changed at all the points I’ve been photographing.  I see I need to go and visit again – most of my early October pictures  don’t look very autumnal at all. The strong winds the other day, the first of the autumn, bared some trees overnight.

Tracking the budding and coming into leaf of an oak tree was part of my project; I added my oak tree information to the national Track-a-Tree observations gathered by Edinburgh University and the Woodland Trust. Looking at the way the tree data are presented on the website gives a useful visual of the arrival of spring in 2015 – see it here. The map might need to be selected first – using the + button, choosing ‘google hybrid’ worked for me. Then choose ‘pedunculate oak’ for species and either ‘bud burst’ or ‘leaf’ for the event.  Then press the play symbol below the map to see when the event took place in different parts of the UK – my oak is the dot furthest NW.  Below is a montage of images of oak through the year so far.

OakAnd this is the the story of the Guelder-rose (Viburnum opulus) I’ve been following since early spring, it’s right by the West Highland Way path. Taking photos is about more than photography! I could download better images of every stage of the plant’s development, but being there, taking the pictures, remembering things makes it more meaningful, certainly more personal.

Guelder-rose

This is the little island near Milarrochy Bay, photographed from April to October.  Just five images chosen to show change.

island montage

As I write we’ve just changed the clocks, a reminder of the shortening  days to come.  I found this quote from John Muir about the earth’s rotation and its apparent immutability:

Eternal sunrise, eternal sunset, eternal dawn and gloaming, on seas and continents and islands, each in its turn, as the round earth rolls.  John of the Mountains: The Unpublished Journals of John Muir, (1938), page 438.

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I’m looking forward to a day event about tree health next week, it seemed to follow naturally from my recent ploys and is organised for Woodland Trust Scotland volunteers (I am one of those as well).  It was a pleasure to be at Loch Katrine last week when the Minister came along to mark the designation of  Scotland’s (and the UK’s)  latest and largest National Nature ReserveThe Great Trossachs Forest. And it’s all within Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park.

Current reading: “Where do camels belong?” by Ken Thompson. The subtitle is: ‘The Story and Science of Invasive Species’.  I understand it’s quite controversial, but I’ve just begun reading it.  I’ve also been reading about the perception of landscape, preferences and the impact on behaviour. In one study in 2010, the authors investigate the links between ‘nature connectedness’ and happiness, concluding that strong connectedness to the natural world is linked to happiness; it could bring about happiness but the opposite may also be true. They indicate that environmental concern is not strongly linked to happiness: perhaps connectedness could ameliorate the negative impact of that concern on happiness.

They argue that closeness to nature could be an indicator of positive behaviour towards the environment; if that is the case, then supporting people to get closer to nature (e.g. more knowledge about and more enjoyment of  nature) could pay dividends for the natural world by positively influencing behaviour towards conservation.

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Misty autumn day at the little island near Arrochymore Point

The following is based on an item in a John Muir Award newsletter. Our values: they inform how we behave and react and they’re strongly connected to emotions; but they can change.  Our values and our attitudes to nature are linked. Nature experiences can have an effect on values; it is thought some experiences of landscape or learning something outdoors, for example, can make people more positive in their attitudes to others, more patient.  The impact of values held might explain why some messages – such as ‘leave no trace’ camping – don’t always get through.

Common Cause for Nature (see here for more info) put forward a map of values, showing that some of the value we hold can conflict. The downloadable Practitioner’s Guide “offers practical recommendations …… on how to ensure their work strengthens the values that motivate people to protect and enjoy nature.”  

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Encouraging people to enjoy, learn about and protect the natural world really interests me and I am sure that, as with many things West of Scotland, health and wellbeing is an important part of the mix. I came across a very readable paper: Health impacts of the John Muir Award (2008), Dr Richard Mitchell & Dr Rebecca Shaw, Public Health and Health Policy, University of Glasgow, published in partnership with John Muir Trust and Glasgow Centre for Population Health. Download it here.  These are parts of their summary conclusion:

“In summary, the John Muir Award has a demonstrable contribution to make to the health, education, environmental and inequalities policy agenda in Scotland.” and  “That the Award appeared to have most benefits for those from most deprived communities is highly significant. However, the study highlighted gross inequalities in experience of wild places before the Award experience, and that young people still perceive barriers to participating in outdoor activities after it.”   So, that’s a big JMA challenge for us all, then.

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 Beauty is before me

And beauty is behind me

Above and below me hovers the beautiful

I am surrounded by it

I am immersed in it

In my youth I am aware of it

And in old age I shall walk quietly

The beautiful trail.

From a Navajo benedictory chant describing the desert, as told to the class at a recent geology lecture; the little poem struck me as appropriate for ‘my’ trail, the lovely bit of the West Highland Way between Balmaha and Milarrochy Bay that I’ve been enjoying so much since spring –  and my seasonal change JMA project  – started .

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I feel it in the air, the summer’s out of reach

So, I made  another visit to my lovely John Muir Award (JMA) area of Loch Lomondside as autumn approaches. See my plan for the JMA challenges of discover, explore, conserve and share. Starting from Milarrochy Bay, I walked south taking photos of various plants and at my photo points as well.  On the way back to Milarrochy Bay from Balmaha Pier, I made a time lapse video of the walk with my little SJ5000 camera on a stick – more on that later.  It was sunny – almost too sunny for some of the photo points, but no complaints: was summer ever really within reach this year?

I think I’ve now lost count of the wildflower species I’ve noted (and, mostly, photographed) since the start of spring, it’s really amazing what variety can be found close by this delightful stretch of the West Highland Way through the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park – there’s a job for me on a rainy day, counting them! A continuing challenge, though, is getting them correctly named and then learned.

With  autumn drifting closer, I saw lots on my last visit: Devil’s-bit Scabious, Common Knapweed, Yarrow, Bell Heather, Heather, Wild Carrot, Enchanter’s-nightshade, Marsh Woundwort, Hedge Woundwort, Harebell, Nipplewort, Goldenrod, Common Cow-wheat, Self-heal, Stone Bramble.  I checked on my Guelder-rose – the little berries are coming along though not yet red.

Guelder rose

There was more oak mildew as well, though I didn’t visit ‘my’oak tree  as I hadn’t brought my complete anti-tick kit with me.   Late afternoon seems to be a time I often walk this walk; it’s quieter and the views are brilliant across the loch.

Heather is a Scottish icon, typically pictured flowering en masse on our hillsides.  I think (!!) there are two types in bloom in my area: Calluna vulgaris – Heather, and brighter Bell Heather, Erica cinerea which flowers earlier.  It was great to see the rocky exposure near Balmaha Pier turned to purple with both types on show.

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heather

Devil’s-bit Scabious (Succisa pratensis) is one of the pleasures of this time of year, its mauve/blue seems to echo the bluebell colour of spring.  It’s an amazing wee flower – some look quite different from others (?gender?) though all seem popular with insects.

devil’s bit

The Hedge and Marsh Woundworts are interesting with their orchid-like flowers. Hedge Woundwort (Stachys sylvatica) is the beetroot coloured one, while Marsh Woundwort (Stachys palustris) is more lilac. They’re both easily seen by the path.

hedge woundwort    DSCF0696

Enchanter’s-nightshade (Circaea lutetiana) was first pointed out to me by a young colleague, H,  in summer 2012 as we were walking along the path (the path, my little exploration zone).  Several wildflower sources describe this plant as ‘easily overlooked’. It’s certainly not easily photographed! It was still flowering away in the shadows on my last visit, but the photo below is from July.

enchanter’s nightshade

I did say I was not doing umbellifers, but the gorgeous Wild Carrot (Daucus carota) deserves special treatment.  I took a nice photo (of flower and insect) here  in August 2012 so I’ll just repeat that one, even though I got some more the other day!  The seed heads are pretty spectacular when you look at them closely: below is an immature one I saw – shows it really was sunny on my last visit!

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The Wild Carrot seed head reminds me of the challenge of recognising your plants at different stages of their year. With the Devil’s-bit Scabious, some of the heads are not yet fully flowering just now and are lovely, a little bit like a bramble fruit.

The time lapse movie made walking from Balmaha Pier to Milarrochy bay is great fun to watch at the computer, but as yet I’ve not worked out how to transfer it to this blog in a viewable fashion.  Videos need to be from You Tube (as I do not pay for my WordPress access): so far so easy.  But uploading the file directly or uploading from iMovie both give a blurry result so I must consult my friend T, who is responsible for tempting me to buy the camera in the first place! He’s very knowledgable.

This blog is serving me as a supplement and a complement to my little John Muir Award Record Books, which I love to write in (I’m on number 4). It’s a way to share, of course: the award asks you to discover, explore, conserve and share. I made up some sheets of July and August wildflowers using own photos taken in my little area; these are an aid to my learning, so I’m sharing the pdfs here: Summer wildflowers1Summer wildflowers2 and Mountain bog Cashel. I put links to two sheets of spring wildflowers (pdfs) in a post entitled “Blinding light through fading grey..”, published in mid-May.

Spotted this link in JMA resources section:  it’s  called ‘5 ways to wellbeing’  – Connect, Be Active, Take Notice, Keep Learning and Give.  Reading the little notes, I can’t believe how well it fits my JMA plan! Find it by searching at issuu.com or see embedded link below. The JMT has ‘fleshed out’ the 5 areas to show how different groups could use the JMA to achieve these – see here.

“But in every walk with Nature one receives far more than he seeks”. John Muir in “Mormon Lilies”, San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin (part 4 of the 4 part series “Notes from Utah”) dated July 1877, published 19 July 1877; reprinted in Steep Trails (1918), chapter 9. (I like that phrase in bold above, but some of  the rest of the piece, not so much!)  Some of my volunteering this year has been about  supporting  access to the outdoors by less well represented groups. In my plan I have something like ‘walk in the NP with…. others’ and ‘appreciate and understand’:  and while these appear in the ‘explore’ corner of the plan, they are also about sharing. The nice folks at Education and Outreach within the National Park offered the chance to volunteer in support of visits by Deaf Blind Scotland and by Greater Pollock Integration Network.  Both of these visits involved walking in my JMA area with some of the group members, so that let me better appreciate and understand the landscape through the senses of others: humbling.

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