When it’s not always raining there’ll be days like this

When there’s no one complaining there’ll be days like this…

The most recent visit to all my special places on Loch Lomondside was accompanied by some wistful thoughts; we’ve had a lovely sunny few days and yet: half way through August, school holidays over and a hint of changing colour on the odd tree.  It was delightful, as always,  to greet the plants, to get to know some new flowers and to stand among my oak and its neighbours, listening.

There’s lots to learn about this photography lark! How hard it is to get all the things right at my chosen photo points: height, direction, angle of elevation to reproduce the same view each time.  But I am pleased to have a record for myself of how slow spring seemed and how the green masses burgeoned  in summer along this stretch of the West Highland Way between Balmaha and Milarrochy Bay.

This is a video (no moving images!) of changes at my 5 photo points between April and August, points chosen to help me appreciate and record seasonal change for my John Muir Award.  I’ve picked just one image from each month at each place. Comparing two or three individual images actually looks better and the separate images are sharper! Never mind. I decided to keep it simple, no fancy transitions or anything. Listen to the authentic sounds of waves lapping the loch shore!

It’s a strange sort of stasis just now, and yet I am still seeing many new things as the summer (“summer”??!!) advances.  So not stasis, then.  One of the things I saw on my last visit was a distinct white/silver tone to parts of ‘my’ oak and its oaky companions: and worse, the white/silver effect is on the once-lovely brighter green of the Lammas growth leaves.  It appears to be a mildew, as predicted by my knowledgable friend, Ranger  A.  Here’s a picture:

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I imagine these wonderful oak trees can put up with quite a lot.  I hope they can – since I started my relationship with this one it’s been the target of hungry caterpillars, had many of its hard won leaves eaten, devoted much energy to sprouting anew at Lammas and now it’s being visited by a mildew, it appears.  Maybe it will feel the strength of my optimistic affection when I am next there!

On the flower front, DSCF0567it’s still that old Coldplay song: they were all yellow...although some were not.   I’ve noticed another ‘new’ flower (for this beginner), the aptly named Goldenrod, Solidago virgaurea – several iSpotters have identified mine as that particular species of Goldenrod; there are many species and subspecies. Now I know where it is, I’ll try to look for and photograph the salient features next time.   Goldenrod to the left.

There was another yellow flower, again new to me, but definitely a type of Hypericum (St John’s Wort), I thought.  After reading through sites and keys, I decided it was either Perforate or Imperforate, so put it on-line to see if iSpotters could help me.  As I write, there are two views – it’s either Perforate or Imperforate!  The distinguishing features of each require me to get into more detail (than I understand or have the capability to photograph) so I’ll just add the photos for the moment:

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Other beautiful things abound in varied habitats of this amazing place. Lots of Meadowsweet (Filiparia Ulmaria) is in fluffy cream blossom. I’ve been enjoying staring closely to find out out why it looks fluffy! And how lovely are the remarkably bright scarlet berries of the Stone Bramble, Rubus saxatilis.

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The sunny bank where the stone bramble resides is noteworthy (for me) in sheltering among its rises and dips a large number of different wildflowers  so far this year: Wood Sorrel, Wood Anemone, Bluebell, Primrose, Wood Avens, Water Avens, hybrid Avens, Common Dog-violet, Common Cow-wheat (and more I’ve not noticed or remembered) as well as ‘my’ Guelder-rose and other shrubs and trees.

Just to make up the colour range on my last visit to the woods, there were Harebell (Campanula rotundifolia) and Wood Crane’s-bill (Geranium sylvaticum).

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Unlike many professional photos, my distinctly amateur images of plants often show, confusingly, the stems, leaves or flowers of others.  This profusion of loveliness is a bonus, though.

The Guelder-rose whose fortunes I’ve been following since April has had a mixed spring and summer: new fresh leaves, then the attentions of the caterpillars!  But there were flowers atop the lacey leaves, and now the berries are developing. Photographed on 27th June and 12th August.

Guelder Rose

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The variety of habitats in a small area is another revelation to me: the bog plants above Cashel are very close to my area of focus on Loch Lomondside, as are the varied environments of the eastern approaches to Conic Hill.  A late July sunny-day walk up to the summit of Conic from the east side gave me Eyebright (below), Water Forget-me-not, Ragged Robin (bottom of two), Meadowsweet, Self-heal, Wild Angelica, Bog Asphodel, Bell Heather, Common Spotted-Orchid and more – drier stoney places, moor, wet ditches, boggy bits, it’s all there.  It really was sunny!

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I suppose there is a conspicuous omission from all this plant learning (or trying to learn) and that’s the umbellifers: the ones with umbels!  Maybe Meadowsweet is counted here – but at least I’m pretty sure of that one.  Wild Angelica I think I know too, but I am uncertain of many others and since some  dangerous poisonous plants look so similar, I’m leaving them – wild carrot, hogweed and the others –  for another time!

Conservation update:  I’ve managed two days as a practical conservation volunteer with Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park in August, one at Critreoch Wildlife Site very close to my chosen John Muir Award area,  and one spraying Japanese Knotweed (Invasive Non-Native species or INNS) around Loch Earn.  The INNS work is surprisingly good fun – in spite of the sweat-filled rubber gloves and the green paper onesie! (Definitely no photos.) That day, the team drove round the loch from patch to patch and we met both visitors and local folk who congratulated us on fighting the good fight! Thanks to NP person G, leader on the day. Dealing with INNS is one of the five challenges in Wild Park 2020, the National Park’s Biodiversity Action Plan.

At Critreoch, where the target is to nurture a species-rich grassland, the volunteer group carried on with bracken bashing, fencing tasks and some removal of young alder under the guidance of Ranger A, who explained why we were doing what we were doing at every turn – brilliant!  Such was the growth of bracken covering up underlying features, I didn’t manage to get to the stream where me and another vol had worked on the previous practical conservation day there in June!  So I don’t know yet if/how our construction survived the rain. My fellow volunteer, lovely L, is cropped out of this photo but it shows the thigh-high bracken being bashed.  I came upon a miniature lichen landscape on a fencepost top and thought it absolutely beautiful.

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